What does Karma mean to you?

“Those who seek to achieve things should show no mercy.”– Kautilya, Indian Philosopher, 3rd Century B.C.

I spent several years in India among the people of that country. I am well acquainted with the concept of karma and dharma. What is more important, I am familiar with it from the point of view of the culture of where they originated. Though I find that much of the Vedic texts have value, and the land, its people and culture are filled with treasures beyond our wildest imaginings, I find, however, for those outside of the belief system of Sanatana Dharma – or as it is called in the West, Hinduism, that the concept of karma becomes too often used as an excuse.

That is never more true than those who fancy themselves to be “Witches”. They claim to be ever so powerful, and yet they act as if they are afraid of themselves. They act as if they are afraid of their own shadows, afraid of their own Will. And then they make excuses for holding back. This fear stays their hand when the gold ring is there for the taking, it makes them cling to the precipice in abject fear, rather than taking to the wind and knowing that they, too, can fly – if not literally, certainly metaphorically.

There is a particularly inane term that is bandied about by more modern would-be Witches. They use this term as some sort of bastard child of karma and call it the “Three Fold Law”. Why not the one fold, or five, or ten or a thousand then? Power is never given, it’s taken. Take it if you want it. If you give your power over to a pre-determined destiny, and label it ‘karma’, you have not therefore exonerated yourself from the responsibility for your own life. If you cannot do something it is because you choose not to do it, not because of some erroneous idea that somehow you did some wrong in a past life – or this one that prevents you. How pathetic! How sad! To live such a life under such a safe term as if to somehow hide safely away from having to make something of your life, and not to take what it is that you want from your time here on Earth is a fate worse than death.

I AM the master of my fate!
I AM the captain of my soul!

There is another term; Maát. I prefer this idea, this term to the one of karma for it is far more immediate. It grants its adherents much more freedom than the idea of karma does. And yet, it also demands more responsibility. Maát is. It is the order of the Universe, of all realms of existence. It understands the scientific idea that for ever action there is an equal and opposite reaction. It essentially says, you may do whatever it is in your life that you want, as long as you are willing to live with the consequences of that. Your thoughts, your words, your deeds, they all effect your life and the world that you live in. Of course you may lie, cheat, steal, even kill. You may even get away with it. Then again – you very well might not. When you don’t, you have no one to blame but yourself for the predicament in which you find yourself. You cannot blame your parents, your past lives or even God. You, and only you are to blame.

Karma is a good idea for those who are willing to accept its limitations and lack of responsibility. For myself, it is simply not enough.

Muse: Fanny Fae
Fandom: Original Character / Folklore / Mythology
Word Count: 578
crossposted to

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7 Comments

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7 responses to “What does Karma mean to you?

  1. limitations?

    So then, I take it you consider Karma somewhat of an outside force affecting the nature of things seemingly beyond influence, or what??

    • Re: limitations?

      Karma is not a concept to which I subscribe. Very little in our lives is outside of influence. My comments are because people hide behind the concept of karma as some sort of ‘moral code’ – with which to keep themselves from what it is that they truly desire, and to comfort themselves when they feel the world and the people within it have done them wrong.

      I don’t believe that any of my past lives have any influence at all on this life. If I make what some call mis-deeds, then I expect the ramifications of such will be there in a more immediate fashion. Conversely, if bad things happen in my life, if I cannot get along with someone in this existence, then neither of these things has anything at all to do with something I did in a past life. I don’t expect that if I was a Hindu saint in my past life that I will live in a palace now.

      Some people take the whole karma concept even further and say if they donate X amount of money then God will heap out rewards tenfold. Ever hear of Robert Templeton Ministries? Watch his show sometime. That is what I am talking about.

      It is limiting if you do not stand up, live as you want. One need only take responsibility for everything in their lives.

  2. Karma is not a concept to which I subscribe. Very little in our lives is outside of influence. My comments are because people hide behind the concept of karma as some sort of ‘moral code’ – with which to keep themselves from what it is that they truly desire, and to comfort themselves when they feel the world and the people within it have done them wrong.

    Fanny,hi.
    Yeah, it’s me. Mamma is asleep so I can come and post an immediate comment-here. I plan to comment on the original piece when I have a chance.
    Hope you won’t delete this entry as it is very good.

    (she actually spells it that way) is the nickname of my Reiki teacher – Sensei. She taught me and certified me in both Karuna and Usui Reiki. I think you two should connect for oh so many reasons.
    I cannot and will not go into her recent life history as she is very private and will not open up unless she totally trusts you.
    I can say I have known her in real life since the late 80s and can trust her with my life.

    I can say she knows much about modern India and Nepal. She has lived there
    for a number of years and has only recently returned. (I cannot say how recent that is as it is for her to say more.) She is the originater of
    Pilgrims Handicrafts and she maintains the site. You can access it by clicking on the url below.

    http://www.pilgrimshandicrafts.com/

    I asked her a number of times people in India view their faith if they are Hindu and how they view he concept of both karma and dharma. She replied
    (my understanding of what she said follows) that most practicing Hindus tend to feel their lives are controlled by the “Gods/Names” or the circumstances they brought with them as a result of all their actions in pevious lives. This can be influenced by their actions in this life and they accumilation of grace through ‘good works’. Hindu believe in Holy people or Saints. The ones with who she spoke, told her that freedom of will is an illusion.

    I can tell you her life in India has changed her perspective on life to a great degree. Before going there to live, she truly believed in Freedom of Choice/You create it all and must accept the consequences perspective. Now,
    from observing her, I suspect she feels its middle ground. You do create it all and you are influenced by what others do as well. You are influenced by both fate, grace and by the cummulative effects of everything you have done up to this point in your life.

    I don’t believe that any of my past lives have any influence at all on this life. If I make what some call mis-deeds, then I expect the ramifications of such will be there in a more immediate fashion. Conversely, if bad things happen in my life, if I cannot get along with someone in this existence, then neither of these things has anything at all to do with something I did in a past life.

    continued down. (part one-finis)

    • Continued from above(part two)

      Maybe yes,maybe no.

      I have learned in life that the ramifications of mis-deeds do not necessarily have to manifest in an immediate fashion. Sometimes they won’t do so for years or even decades. Sometimes they will manifest immediately.

      If a person believes in past lives, that person will be affected by their beliefs as surely as flowers are influenced by the rays of the sun, hence,
      they will create circumstances and attract people who will validate said believes.

      I don’t expect that if I was a Hindu saint in my past life that I will live in a palace now.

      Honey, if you were a Hindu Saint, you would be considered able to get off the ‘Wheel of Kharma’ and choose not to return to the world of physical reality or you could choose to live any sort of life you choose to create.
      If you did not like life in a palace, you would not have to create one.
      Hindu Saints can choose the circumstances of their next incarnation because of their spirituality, grace and connection to their God(s). Most folks are not that lucky.

      Some people take the whole karma concept even further and say if they donate X amount of money then God will heap out rewards tenfold. Ever hear of Robert Templeton Ministries? Watch his show sometime. That is what I am talking about.

      You mean Texas’ own Robert Tilton? Did he change his name yet again? He has been called a scam artist by the bunco squad of several police departments across the united states.He send out pictures of hands, scraps of clothe, cut out images of crosses on which to write your prayer requests which you must send back to him along with 10% to 20% (power tithe) of your GROSS not net income. If you do that, your prayers will be answered IF YOU BELIEVE.
      Now if they are’nt answered your faith has not been and is not ‘strong enough and you have let ‘doubt’ creep in.

      Mr. Tilton has been under investigation by the legal authorities several times over the years. He manages to stay within a hair-breath of the legal
      limits of the law. That is how he has managed to get away with it.

      It is limiting if you do not stand up, live as you want. One need only take responsibility for everything in their lives.

      Ever hear of Dick Sutphens?

      His thinks of Karma as a great life bio-feedback device. He often explains it by using the word GIGO “Garbage In,Garbage Out.” If you want to change what life is showing you, change how you are acting, thinking, feeling and believing.

      In fact he likens Karma to a computer programme. Change the programming you are giving your ‘computer’-your mind and you will change your life.

      He stresses you cannot blame everyone else if you put garbagey programming into your mental computer. You can only blame yourself. The way out of a current mess is not to stay plugged into it,but, rather to, change the programming you are currently giving it while at the same time dealing with the results output or display of the garbagey imput you previously had entered into your mental computer.

      It is his view of Karma I am personally the closest to in affinity.

      Will be back with more after I talk to to make sure
      of my facts.

      Take care.
      Huggles.
      Senebty.
      N

  3. Error corrected.

    I can say she knows much about modern India and Nepal. She has lived there
    for a number of years and has only recently returned. (I cannot say how recent that is as it is for her to say more.) She is the originater of
    Pilgrims Handicrafts and she maintains the site. You can access it by clicking on the url below.

    She knows much about modern India and Nepal should instead read as:

    “She knows much about modern India and TIBET”

    Thanks.
    N.

    • Re: Error corrected.

      The point of my posting to was to expound on a concept that few Westerners understand. They may think they do, but they do not at all.

      In the West, unlike in the East, the idea of karma is used as an excuse, just as I said. That alone was the basis of what I was talking about. I know well enough the precepts of Sanatana Dharma. I know them well enough that though I value and respect them, I am not an adherent to that religion. I honour my friends such as , who is in fact Hindu, and though our philosophies do not exactly match up, respect remains. There are many interpretations of karma, from many gurus of Sanatana Dharma. What is most important when one is Hindu is the acceptance of the Vedas.

      Interpretation of theses, however, has led to the differences in what the laws of karma are for the various adherents. The fact since the concept’s introduction in the 19th century to the world outside of Asia, there have been many wrong-headed interpretations by those outside of the culture.

      Hence my essay.

      • Re: Error corrected.

        And a Great essay it is too.

        I know very little about the Hindu religion on a personal level. I am Kemetic, first and foremost. I believe in taking responsibility for my actions and working to act appropriately under any I find myself. I don’t always succeed, but, I made a committed attempt to do so.

        For me – on a real personal level, I have come to view Ma’at as Karma in action. I recognise that it is not the traditional Western, Eastern or Hindu perspective of the principle…but I know it is what the principle is to me.

        It’s a very interesting topic you have chosen to approach.

        I will add more fuel to the fire of thought, with an additional spark.

        Recently I have been talking with a few former members of the Left handed path. They come from various traditions within that path.
        Some are Luciferians. Others are Satanists and still others are members of the Temple of Set.

        The single unifying thing they all say is that Karma as it is currently defined in the West is a classic excuse for not taking responsibility for one’s actions through the avoidance of doing what one thinks is right to achieve what one wants.

        They all say that they are willing and able to accept the consequences of their actions whereas practitioners of other faiths
        (they named some…I won’t name them here)won’t. Instead, they look
        for some saviour to become their ‘patsy’. Someone who will take on the consequences of their actions should these be ‘off the mark’ or -‘a mistake’- by suffering torement in their stead.

        A novel perspective to be sure.. and one that touched a sore spot with me. Since I can remember – from my earliest days of life, the idea of some innocent being tortured, pursecuted and put to death for any mistake I might have done has always saddened me and yes angered me. I have never been filled with joy at the idea that my
        ‘saving’ depended upon the willful and purposeful destruction of another whoever that is…

        I think what I love about Ma’at is the idea of balance, order and the focus on taking appropriate action and personal responsiblity
        for such that is inherent within it.

        Ma’at is cool.

        Thanks for responding.

        Do you mind if I plug you on various community journals?
        Let me know.
        N.

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